Sunday, June 09, 2013

The REAL Hate Crime

1.  I need to correct something related to the "Gay Bar Shootings" story from a few days ago.


Just to recapitulate, 4 years ago a man broke into the Tel Aviv "Youth Bar," a gay lounge, and shot the place up, murdering some people.  Israel back then was awash with media accusations that it was all the fault of the Orthodox because they dared not approve of homosexuality.  The press and the homosexual lobby dubbed it a hate crime against homosexuals, and claimed it proved how intolerant and bigoted Israelis are, especially the Orthodox.  International anti-Semitic homosexual organizations were set up to support the jihad.


Then this past week the Israeli police arrested 4 people for involvement in the shootings, all gay members of the Youth Bar lounge.   Meaning it was NOT an anti-homosexual hate crime.  Indeed, the real hate crime here was the anti-Orthodox campaign of invective launched by the media and the homosexual lobby.


Meanwhile, there is still a gag order on about the details, but I posted my sense of what the media were hinting at, regarding what really happened in those shootings.   I guessed that the murders were the consequences of unrequited love among some members of the lounge.  It now appears that that is not quite correct and the true story is far worse from the point of view of anyone trying to promote tolerance for homosexuals.


The press is still playing peek-a-boo and is still being coy about the full story.  But from reading all the reports by reporters who have the facts but are still not allowed to report them freely except by hint, it now appears that the shootings were triggered by the molestation of a minor by one of the homosexual activists in the lounge and then that minor's family or friends decided to avenge this molestation by shooting the place up.   If this turns out to be the correct explanation, it will be amusing to watch the responses of the militant homosexual anti-Orthodox lobby trying to spin THIS one!




2.  From Algemeiner - hope you find this interesting


The Fallacy, Delusion and Myth of Tikkun Olam

June 7, 2013 10:45 am 0 comments

Aleinu Arnold Jacob Wolf Grand Rabbi Y. A. Korff Kabbalah Kashrus Orthodox Judaism Rabbi Jill Jacobs Ten Commandents The Jewish Press Tikkun Olam – It is so very difficult, indeed utterly unbearable, to sit silently by while Jews, and now the general religious and secular communities, completely misuse and distort the term Tikkun Olam– certainly not intentionally or out of any malice, but rather out of ignorance in the pursuit of virtuous goals and principles which may be applicable to general society and civilization but which have tragically become a poor substitute for authentic religious observance.

This repair rhetoric has become an obsession, a catch-all credo. Everything today is Tikkun Olam. Enough with the Tikkun Olam. It is a senseless and meaningless misconception, its true meaning nothing like it is commonly used and purported to be.

It is not at all a centuries-old tradition, it is not a call to action, and it is not a commandment. And to be clear, Tikkun Olam does not even mean repairing the world in the sense of social justice. Nor in traditional sources is Tikkun Olam in any way even a direct human imperative or action, but rather one that is left in G-d's hands.

We cannot, and are not instructed to, save the world, or even to repair it. Judaism teaches no such thing. Rather, we are instructed to conduct ourselves properly, to observe the Mitzvos, the Commandments (which are not good deeds, but rather commandments, required imperatives), and in that way to contribute to society and civilization both by example and through practice and action.

For Jews those Mitzvos include not simply socially or politically correct precepts such as giving charity and engaging in political action, but also observance of the Sabbath, dietary restrictions (Kashrus), daily prayer, and other commandments which seem to have fallen out of favor and are ignored, if not openly denigrated and violated, in some segments of the community, as they substitute the false panacea of something they call Tikkun Olam for the authenticity of true Judaism, clinging desperately to Tikkun Olam to avoid their actual responsibilities as Jews to observe the Torah and the commandments.

The term and concept Tikkun Olam appears nowhere in the Torah itself, but first appears only in the Mishna and Talmud in the context of the courts and halakhic (legal) regulations involving disputes and legal rights.

Subsequently in Kabbalah the term was used to refer to the upper worlds or to the repair of the individual soul damaged by the sin of violating or neglecting Jewish law. Following that, the only mention of Tikkun Olam in prayer is in the Aleinu prayer recited at the conclusion of every service, but even in that context it means either that G-d, not man, will ultimately repair the world, or, as others interpret, it does not mean repair of the world at all but rather is a prayer for the uprooting of idolatry, the rebuilding of the Temple and establishing G-d's kingdom on earth, through the observance of the commandments and not through any separate social imperative.

Indeed, scholars from across the spectrum and diversity of the Jewish community have acknowledged and bemoan the misuse and distortion of the term Tikkun Olam by the community.

Thus Rabbi Jill Jacobs observed years ago (Zeek, July 2007) that, "In its current incarnation, Tikkun Olam can refer to anything from a direct service project such as working in a soup kitchen or shelter, to political action, to philanthropy. While once regarded as the property of the left, the term is now widely used by mainstream groups such as synagogues, camps, schools, and federations, as well as by more rightwing groups wishing to cast their own political agendas within the framework of Tikkun Olam."

After quoting Arnold Jacob Wolf ("Repairing Tikkun Olam," Judaism 50:4), who writes, "All this begins, I believe, with distorting tikkun olam. A teaching about compromise, sharpening, trimming and humanizing rabbinic law, a mystical doctrine about putting God's world back together again, this strange and half-understood notion becomes a huge umbrella under which our petty moral concerns and political panaceas can come in out of the rain," Jacobs points out that one of the key figures in the Kabbalistic school of thought which developed the concept of Tikkun Olam was the same person who codified Jewish law, since it is individual observance of halakha, Jewish law, which is the way to repair the world.

Professor Steven Plaut of Haifa University wrote about "The Rise of Tikun Olam Paganism" (The Jewish Press, January 23, 2003), calling it a "pseudo-religion," "social action fetishism" (The Jewish Press, November 19, 2008) and a "vulgar misuse and distortion by assimilationists." He concludes that Tikkun Olam is quite clearly "a theological notion and not a trendy socioeconomic or political one," observing that, "It would be an exaggeration, but only a small one, to say that nothing in Judaism directs us to the pursuit of social (as opposed to judicial) justice."

Most recently there was the publication earlier this year by Oxford University Press of the scholarly book Faith Finding Meaning: A Theology of Judaism by Rabbi Byron L. Sherwin, which also highlights the current fallacy (pages 33-35). Calling it "a blatant distortion of the meaning of the term," a "substitute faith" and a "shibboleth," he writes that "the current [promiscuous] usage of this term represents a category mistake, is a blatant example of conversion by redefinition, and constitutes a paradigmatic example of the reductionist fallacy" which is merely "liberation theology without the theology." He concludes, "Tikkun Olam means 'for the proper order of the Jewish community.' It is a long way from that definition to 'build a better world.'"

Please. Everyone. Enough with the Tikkun Olam. For Jews who truly do want to engage in Tikkun Olam, the only honest and authentic Jewish way to do that is to encourage observance of the Torah across the entire spectrum of the Jewish Community. That in fact is actually what our responsibility is, nothing more and nothing less, and the rest is up to G-d—if we do our part, so will G-d.

Grand Rabbi Y. A. Korff, the Zvhil-Mezbuz Rebbe of Boston, is Chaplain of The City of Boston and spiritual leader of the Zvhil-Mezbuz Beis Medrash in downtown Boston and Newton. This column first appeared in The Jewish Advocate of Boston.


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